Explore Ireland’s wild and beautiful Wicklow Mountains on foot

Wicklow Valley

Discover Kippure Estate’s breath taking Wicklow scenery at your own pace

Kippure Estate, located by the Wicklow Mountains, is especially lucky to be able to offer some of the most stunning views in the country, making it ideal if you enjoy rambling.

Whether you’re part of a walking club or you just want to take some time out with your friends and family, Kippure Estate is the ideal base for your holiday. No matter what your level of fitness, we have something for everyone. Discover rolling mountains, natural woodlands, gentle lakes and miles and miles of sandy beaches.

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Passage to the Otherworld

Tom Grave Seefin Wicklow

Seefin Passage Grave on Seefin Mountain

Bordering on Wicklow Mountains National Park, atop a 621-metre summit, lies a wonderful relic over 5,000 years old.

On top of Seefin Mountain, you’ll discover this passage tomb – what the national park describes at its “most dramatic archaeological site”. The tomb’s narrow entryway is demarked by three slabs fixed amidst a large, circular cairn (a mound of burial stones). The 11-metre passageway arrives at a rectangular chamber – those who enter can tap into their ancient imagination and ponder who may have been interred in the five chambers.

According to legend, … Continue reading

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Retracing 55 KM of History

art o' neill challenge

Winter Walking in the Wicklow Hills

The epic Art O’Neill Challenge took place again recently (January 13th- 14th). The 55 km-route commenced in Dublin and ended in Glenmalure, passing through the nearby Wicklow Mountains National Park. Approximately 450 brave walkers and hikers wearing winter hats, waterproof pants and head torches, armed with emergency kits and GPS devices participated in this ultimate trek, retracing the steps of Hugh Roe O’Donnell and Art O’Neill from over 400 years ago.

Participants had the choice of walking or running the roadway and cross-country terrain. Walkers commenced one minute before midnight, a feat that typically takes between 12 and 16 hours. … Continue reading

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